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Narrative Control


Dec 5, 2008

Hi and welcome to Narrative Control, Episode 14.  This week Justin and I talk about bringing indie games to your table.  We share some of the resistance we’ve experienced as well as offer some advice for how to get your group to open up and try one out.

Hosts: Sean Nittner, Justin Evans

Length: 18:01

Show Notes

[00:28] Intro to the show. Bringing indie games to your kitchen table.
[01:03] Give credit where it’s due.  Thanks to you Mikael.
[01:36] Battle of Wits cards. Sinstergame.com domain name down.  Backup URL: http://02af916.netsolhost.com/sinistergame/
[02:07] Narrative Control Holiday Schedule.
[02:45] RPG Podcast Promo
[02:55] Sean’s problem.  Cream is available.
[03:16] Sean’s other problem. I want to play indie games.
[04:56] I’m missing cookies.  That must be the problem.
[05:22] Perception of indie games. Lack of familiarity. This is something new. I don’t know what that is.
[05:52] More responsibility being placed in the hands of the players.
[07:09] Traditional games don’t have a mechanic for handing over narrative control.
[08:20] Idea that Indie games are one-shot games.  This could discourage players who want to see long term games and character progression.
[10:24] How I’ve been able to convince my group to try a game.
[10:28] Lead by example.  Want to play a game? Run it!
[10:58] Focus on just the first session of a game.  Character creation or a pitch session.
[12:28] Focus on the setting or genre of the game rather than the system. 
[13:34] Justin’s synopsis of my methods: be sneaky, sugar coat it. Thanks Justin.
[13:48] Try to tailor games to the player’s interest.
[14:18] Are there any gateway games? Have I been gushing about Fate enough already?
[15:15] Start with a gateway system or hack in indie elements into traditional games?
[17:06] Request for feedback.  Let me know if you’ve had the same frustrations or if you have some other solutions.

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